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Another micro "Spey"
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Author Topic: Another micro "Spey"  (Read 12403 times)
riveraddict
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« on: July 13, 2012, 06:02:31 PM »

   I've mentioned this rod before, in a sink-tip aspect and didn't get in-depth with it as regards floating lines... the TFO 8' 9" 4 weight Lefty Kreh Finesse. Since my local flow has shrunk down to less than a 50 cfs volume and the big lake-run bass have left the system, I've had the catalyst to get more time in on this particular micro conversion rod with a floater. This rod casts awesome with the exact same grainage as the 9 1/2' Cabelas 3 weight CZN that I covered earlier somewhere on this site - 150 grain belly of around 11'-12' with a 5'-6' 50 grain floating tip. The feel is more "relaxing" and forgiving - gives a lot more "feedback" than the CZN - as this rod is described to have a more "classic", finesse-type action. This is another "easy to get into" micro Spey... the rod is only around $180, just add a lower handle, and build a line. It's been great fun on Smallies of 6" to 12" and the occasional 16" to 20" Pike. A 15" bass will rock your world on this rod. With the mentioned line specs, this little stick will throw the MEAT - 3" streamers and uglies - that it takes to interest these kinds of fish - without being too much rod to enjoy this class of fish. Make yourself a micro Spey and take advantage of those little local brown lines that most everyone ignores, plus stay in touch, Hell, actually IMPROVE your Skagit casting technique and have a bunch of fun doing it!       
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riveraddict
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2012, 07:37:13 AM »

   I should clarify here that I am in no way affiliated with Cabelas or TFO and am not trying in any way to imply that the rods mentioned are the best or only options available for the described tasks. I'm sure that just about any singlehanded rod can be successfully "converted" into a micro-Spey capacity if a proper line-to-rod relationship is determined. However, the Cabelas CZN and TFO Finesse rods mentioned, are rods that I have personally tested and proven to function very nicely in a micro-Spey capacity through much on-the-water time and thus I can offer up an honest recommendation on them.
   
         
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yuhina
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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2012, 07:45:00 AM »

   I've mentioned this rod before, in a sink-tip aspect and didn't get in-depth with it as regards floating lines... the TFO 8' 9" 4 weight Lefty Kreh Finesse. Since my local flow has shrunk down to less than a 50 cfs volume and the big lake-run bass have left the system, I've had the catalyst to get more time in on this particular micro conversion rod with a floater. This rod casts awesome with the exact same grainage as the 9 1/2' Cabelas 3 weight CZN that I covered earlier somewhere on this site - 150 grain belly of around 11'-12' with a 5'-6' 50 grain floating tip. The feel is more "relaxing" and forgiving - gives a lot more "feedback" than the CZN - as this rod is described to have a more "classic", finesse-type action. This is another "easy to get into" micro Spey... the rod is only around $180, just add a lower handle, and build a line. It's been great fun on Smallies of 6" to 12" and the occasional 16" to 20" Pike. A 15" bass will rock your world on this rod. With the mentioned line specs, this little stick will throw the MEAT - 3" streamers and uglies - that it takes to interest these kinds of fish - without being too much rod to enjoy this class of fish. Make yourself a micro Spey and take advantage of those little local brown lines that most everyone ignores, plus stay in touch, Hell, actually IMPROVE your Skagit casting technique and have a bunch of fun doing it!       

Oh boy!! I think I get hooked on those Micro spey! I am afraid some single handed rods are going to get hurt... in the butt!  Smiley  ha...

So far, I have some experience with fiberglass switch rods conversion, I noticed that soft progressive-bend rod seems doing great. It has puzzled me at first since I always think spey cast require relatively stronger tip ( regressive action). Particularly when I learned the skagit casting (CM/CL) Ed's style with the Loomis 6/7 Dredger. I thought the deep bent regressive taper is required to do the CM/CL casting well. At least to have highest efficient energy transfer. But after few short conversion rods, I am not sure if the regressive taper is really necessary for the CM/CL casting.

Great post! Ed.
Enjoy reading it!

Mark
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