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Easy skagit head formula for single hand rods?
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Author Topic: Easy skagit head formula for single hand rods?  (Read 30690 times)
riveraddict
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« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2012, 08:54:56 AM »

Middlecalf,
   OOPs! Glad you pointed that out... the belly is 12' in length and weighs 185 grains. The total line, including tips, is 22' long. I have corrected the mistake in the post.

Skagit Mist,
   Incorporating a haul is a real benefit for one handed Skagit casting. Even on very short casts, a haul really tightens up the cast compared to one without a haul. Still, I have found for myself that the use of two hands in casting generates more power with less perceivable effort than one handed casting, even with the addition of the haul to the one handed casting. I used to attribute this to the "spreading out" of effort over a pair of muscle sets (two hands) as opposed to one, but I'm now beginning to think that it has just as much to do with the "fulcrum" casting mechanics made available via the use of two hands.

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schroderfish
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« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2012, 10:31:20 AM »

Currious, what are you guys using for running lines on your conversion speys.
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skagit mist
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« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2012, 12:02:12 PM »

I like the new 25lb slickshooter.
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Northwest winters make steelhead chrome that much brighter

riveraddict
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« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2012, 08:42:12 AM »

   Preferences are going to vary according to one's personal "feel" and objectives. A runningline that is targeted towards providing optimum mending will have quite different characteristics than one aimed at yielding characteristics of low friction. In general, better mending is provided by runninglines having more "mass" - PVC coated runninglines - whereas lowest friction is a product of minimum diameter - mono type runninglines. Myself, I like traits of low friction to enhance aspects of high line speed in casting as high line speed provides the best accuracy in casting. Therefore, I use 20# Berkeley Big Game mono in the Solar Green color... it's inexpensive, tough, durable, low stretch, and fairly stiff so it shoots well. The "down sides" to it are that many people find mono hard to hold onto and also stiff monos need to be stretched prior to use in order to remove the coiling that results from line "memory".     
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middlecalf
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« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2012, 01:33:21 PM »

Haven't got there yet, but here's my thoughts, open to suggestions/corrections on my assumptions.

I'm considering the wulff ambush lines, integrated head and running line.  For this application (trout/bass) I don't think I'll be needing to send out long casts, so not as worrried about slickness.  The accuracy of the cast will be more important, so need to think about that, but the integrated running line should help with mending.  And I don't anticipate changing out heads once I dial in the line, just change the tips, from floating to polyleader type sink tips.  I'm planning on swinging light wets/small streamers.  Still have a bit before the rod will be ready, so I have time to think this through more.
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stibra
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« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2015, 03:36:49 PM »


   Now then, to work up a Skagit line for sinktips, the weight of the entire floating upline is used as the basis for the weight of the intended Skagit belly. So, using as an example, a singlehanded 4 weight rod rated to cast a line of 120 grains. To create a dedicated Spey-type casting floating line for this rod, we uplined it to a 7 wt floating line, AFTMA 185 grains. To produce a Skagit belly, we take the weight of that floating upline - 185 grains - and use that figure as the target weight of our Skagit belly. The next consideration for working up a Skagit belly is to figure the needed length of the belly. To do this one must first determine intended overall length of line (including tips), along with the length of tips to be used and rod length. I've found through experience that an overall line length ratio of around 2.5 times rod length to be very useful, so that will be the target. We'll also use T-8 MOW's as the intended tips to be used as that's what I'm using on my 4 weight conversion and they are 10' long. My 4 weight conversion rod is about 9' long (8'9" plus 4" lower handle addition). So, 2.5 times rod length = approximately 22', minus the 10' length of the MOW tips = 12'. So, I'm looking to work up a Skagit belly of about 185 grains @ around 12' in length. That's pretty much "how it's done"... hope it makes sense!          
      

Hi,

How would you cut floating Ambush head, 290 grain (#8) to get the 200 grain Micro skagit head for 10' #4 faster rod?

Should I cut it just from the front to have more thick head, or combine with cutting at the back to have less thickness? The back end has nice taper and loop, hard to make that nice one Smiley
I have only 5 foot to cut, so probably would not be enough just to cut it in the front to get down to 200 grain, but not sure.

Thanks,

Stibra
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 03:39:28 PM by stibra » Logged

camosled
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« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2015, 05:18:42 PM »

I wouldn't cut very much from the rear as that is where the mass is....But I know very little about that taper so I can't say what the front end looks like.   My usual tweak to a line is:  I cut the skinny back taper off, say a foot of it so there remains a slight taper, but the wimpy part is gone and then add a braided mono loop made from 50 lb Cortland braid.  Then I start trimming from the front in 1 foot chunks to get the line to cast right.  I leave the front end a little long for my final tweaks when I add a sink tip. I use a sink tip that is the length of the rod so my casting stroke and anchor stay consistent and then make micro snips to the front end of the floating section to make it perfect.   Everyone has their preferred method.

Good luck.

JM

 
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stibra
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« Reply #22 on: February 19, 2015, 01:24:20 AM »

Ambush is triangle taper, continous taper from back to front.
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camosled
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« Reply #23 on: February 19, 2015, 11:48:26 AM »

Well then I would cut from the front so you don't loose critical mass in ass and work towards your ideal length and weight.

JM

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