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Two-hander trout pics - throw 'em up.
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Author Topic: Two-hander trout pics - throw 'em up.  (Read 34067 times)
G_Smolt
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« Reply #30 on: June 18, 2013, 09:40:32 PM »

Bumpity-bump...

29" of Native Rainbow love on the E3 7130 and a 420gr rage / 10' int poly / super-dirty low{hush} fly.
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camosled
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« Reply #31 on: June 19, 2013, 12:45:28 PM »

alright, so as a PNW steelheader can you tell me why those big bows make you hyperventilate say, more than a fresh chromer? not sure if you said that but wondering about it. i imagine it has something to do with the setting, the  attitude of the resident fish, if that can be measured, and the ripping grab? oh and the absolute beauty of the strain of species must weigh in heavy. how do they mixed it up as compared to a steelhead, toe to toe instead of long burning runs? both? kinda breathing hard now..

I hope it never comes to this, but if I had to pick one or the other, it would be big-ass 'bows on the swing.

Here's a few reasons...

> Rainbows live there. They ain't on a spawning journey, they are in their house, at their table, feeding. Comparatively little guilt when contrasted with some wild coastal steel system that might only get 50 spawning pairs a year, yet there I am, messin' with their heads after they have been at sea for 3 years.

> Because they are feeding, it doesn't matter if the water is 1° away from slush...they are eating. Large predatory fish on the hunt for calories means savage grabs, the kind that are literally shocking in their violence. I have caught hundreds and hundreds of steelhead on the swing, and thousands by other methods, and the nearest comparison I can make is that the best plug takedown EVER by a big ol' pissed off native buck in the 36" range...is about 3/4 of a regular old 26"-28" 'bow grab. Seriously. Be prepared to wave  goodbye a lot to whatever it is that just hit your shit and started ripping downstream like a snagged freshwater dolphin, because if you go thinking you are going to manhandle 15+ lbs of finely muscled, pissed off wild lake-run 'bow in a 6mph current, you are sadly mistaken.

> Because the places big huge trout live in are the last of the wild places left on earth...Ed mentioned the other (Kamchatka - one day, I will sit at you or Jeff's feet and ply you with booze, just to listen to tales of untouched rivers and fish that have never seen a fly), but aside from there and AK, I'm just not sure there are any places left on earth that we (folks in general) haven't fuzzed up enough as to render them marginal to the larger constituency of this species.

> Because you never know what you are going to get. Dryside steel in october, you are pretty much primed to do business with 6-8 lb fish, with the odd b-run thrown in for good measure. They all grab pretty much the same, with the exception of a few "wet sock" fish as the water gets a little colder...with trout, if it is over 16", odds are your reel is backlashing, your heart jumps out of your chest, and you let out an involuntary, high-pitched sound that manly dudes like Bacon would call " a little girly noise" - yet you still don't know how big this particular fish is. If I had a dime for every foot of line stripped off by sub-22" fish in the heavy currents of the big Bristol Bay rivers, I would be a far richer man than I already am. One of the most memorable of the savage grabs I had last fall was a 24" fish, about 5lbs, that SMOKED me...all of my running line gone in one continuous, oddly bonefish-like grab n go. Shocked me so much I almost fell down. It was all I could do to hold on and not doofus the fish off...but that is what even small to midsized fish are capable of on every swing.

>Because in this day and age, rare is the opportunity to fish for a strain of rainbow trout with ZERO artificial genetic incursion...while this may not be outwardly obvious, it is much the same as ol' Ed Abbey's visions of wilderness - You don't have to see it to know that it is there, and the fact that it is there should be a comfort to your soul.

And THAT, mojo, is why you should deny yourself no more and make the pilgrimage.

You may pry away when we meet.  And it won't take much booze.  In 2000,  my last year guiding in Kamchatka,  our a average rainbow was 28".  Largest was 33 1/2 which died from sheer exhaustion when I beached it.  No mortal wound.  Just old age I think.  We made ceviche out of it.  It was an unbelievable time to be there.

JM
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G_Smolt
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« Reply #32 on: June 19, 2013, 02:02:24 PM »

When we meet AGAIN - we met in PDX the last year of Furimsky's Fly Fishing Show. I was showing "Red Gold" to the masses, which that day consisted of you and kid(s?)...needless to say, everyone was a bit distracted.

I would still love to chitchat about nerd stuff on the 'bows - I am officially damaged goods on big trout now.

Last Years' prize, and my current trout of a lifetime - 33"x19.5"

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camosled
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« Reply #33 on: June 19, 2013, 03:38:39 PM »

You're right!  My mind is gone.  My buddy calls it the "Dumb Dad's Club", where everyone joins after having kids...

Nice trout.

JM

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riveraddict
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« Reply #34 on: June 19, 2013, 11:45:12 PM »

   If I had a choice of fishing AK 'bows versus most inland strains of summer steelhead, it would be no contest... AK 'bows wins every time. I would even choose fishing an AK stream where the trout got no bigger than 20" over most inland summer steel. The attitude of AK 'bows, regardless of size, is very duly impressive.
   Now then, if the choice was AK 'bows versus early summer coastal steel or early winter coastal steel, then I would have a lot of thinking to do. One other "trout" that would enter such a contest for me would be the Kundzha, if I were allowed to select the river system and time of year. They can be like early summer coastal steel, except FAR more aggressive!
   G, your 'bow pics are fantastic and make me sick... sick that I'm gonna miss out on another season up there! Keep throwing up more pics as you get 'em, they're just too cool not to share! I'll get back up there myself some day. For now, anyone wanna see some carp?!
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SLSS
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« Reply #35 on: June 20, 2013, 05:53:51 PM »

Damn, G. Those are some fish.
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camosled
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« Reply #36 on: June 23, 2013, 01:02:29 PM »

When we meet AGAIN - we met in PDX the last year of Furimsky's Fly Fishing Show. I was showing "Red Gold" to the masses, which that day consisted of you and kid(s?)...needless to say, everyone was a bit distracted.

I would still love to chitchat about nerd stuff on the 'bows - I am officially damaged goods on big trout now.

Last Years' prize, and my current trout of a lifetime - 33"x19.5"



Dang....That's a dinosaur...

JM
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swingman
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« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2013, 09:59:09 AM »

Dammmm G that is a P. I. G.     Hawg
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Origami
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« Reply #38 on: November 21, 2013, 10:57:03 PM »

I'll play, here's a few Eastern Idaho Trout, not anything like those 30"+ fish



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G_Smolt
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« Reply #39 on: July 21, 2014, 02:49:07 PM »

Bump for troots.

a few pics from fall '13 / Spring '14

Enjoy - I know I did.









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