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Rods: Fast or slow
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Author Topic: Rods: Fast or slow  (Read 12106 times)
camosled
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« on: January 12, 2011, 04:58:54 PM »

One thing we failed to discuss in Scott's DVDs is which rod action best suits specific fishing situations.  Ed has posted, to great length, the benefit of using deeper flexing rods for all around fishing because they load easily in-close and the casting stroke, much like a bamboo rod, is a smooth, relaxed movement.  However, there are a number of fast and super fast action rods out there, when loaded with a ton of grains (like 750gr.), cast skagit heads and super heavy sink tips easily.  So I'm curious, which to you prefer?  I own a garage full of both types and use both regularly.  I have settled into the Z Axis 7136-4 as my favorite all-around rod and the old Sage 8136-4 as a great heavy tip winter rod.   

You?

JM

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ronic
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2011, 06:45:16 PM »

not being a Sage guy, just how fast is a Z axis rod vs the old Sage? and what grain weights are you casting with these rods?
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camosled
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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2011, 10:55:25 PM »

Most Z Axis Rods are very fast.  The Z Axis 7136 is the slowest action of the Gen 5 Technology two handers, but still light years faster than the old brown 7136.  I like the new 7136 because it is very smooth and doesn't have the instant unload and load sequence of the other models in that line, and it's super light in the hand.   SAGE is all about line speed and you can achieve that, it that's your soup.

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Jelly Roll
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2011, 11:36:49 PM »

I prefer fast action rods since I like to use scandi heads in the summer. I got a new Burkheimer 6126 that is my new favorite. For big tips and dirty work I have a 7133 and 8140 B2x. I've been using the 6wt Burkie on the Umpqua with a 510 compact and 10ft of T-11 and leaving the big rods in the car. It seems to get the job done just fine, we'll see what happens if I hook a 2-striper .
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mojo
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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2011, 11:46:20 PM »

winston bIIx 8130. the sleeper rod in the winny line up which is not that extensive anyway. super light in the hand at 6.75 oz. it loads nice and deep into the butt, has good speed with incredibly quick power and a fast recovery. a true delight to angle with as it is very accurate and does not like to be muscled. it has amazing reserve power that tops out at 625 grains for me. a great winter rod that is hard to beat in my book. a 600 gr. airflo compact skagit or a rio 575 gr. skagit flight rocks 12 ft of t-14.
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mkskagit
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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2011, 09:26:44 AM »

I have limited experience when it comes to using a variety of two handers.  My first two hander was an echo classic, 13' 7wt, fished this with a 470 airflo skagit and I rocked that for a few years, really enjoyed it.  My bro then wrapped me a Rainshadow 13' 7 wt, and this rod is a cannon.  Its got a lot of reserve power, fast action, pretty light weight, really nice feeling rod.  Lined up with a 500 skagit to 550 head it loads easy, throws big flies and tips without too much work.  Fished it with a 410 scandi on the NU this summer, felt a bit underlined but if you watched your anchor and took it easy it would fly. 

My saltwater rig for stripers is a forecast 13 ft 8/9.  This rod is a very fast action, and has a ton of power behind it.  I load it up with a 700 grain skagit flite and it goes, really fun rod, throws huge bugs and tips with ease. 

Mike
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FK
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2011, 04:18:22 PM »

My fishing partner and I teach spey casting on the weekends.  One huge bonus to us the opportunity to test cast so many rods the students bring to the classes.

We have settled on the new Sage Z-Axis and TCX rods as our personal favorites.  The 7136 Z-Axis is a real standout for smooth casting and fishing, two of our students purchased the rod after test casting ours.  The 7126 TCX is an outstanding casting rod for Scandi heads.  I really like the 8129 and 8134 Z-Axis designs for Skagit lines.

We also use the lighter 4wt and 5wt rods for local trout fishing, TFO Deer Creek makes a fantastic 11' 4wt and 12.5' 4/5 wt for very light lines in the 245-270gr range.   

Another outstanding rod is the new 5119 TCX.  I already had the 5110 Z-Axis and when my dealer received the new 5119 TCX, I tried it out on the river for a few hours,,, the rod was never returned to the dealer's rack.  With a 375gr Skagit Short or AFS 5/6 at 340gr, this little rod is amazing.


Regards,
FK
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thedude
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2011, 06:35:49 PM »

Such an open ended question with so many variables due to what line you pair it with.

But I tend to like a faster rod mainly because of my faster stroke. My go to winter stick is the same as Mojo the 8130 BIIX. Its faster than the 7133 BIIX and seems to fit my casting style perfectly. I do rig it a little lighter though with the 570 Compact. Seems like the slower rods work for me too, I just have to deliberatly think about what I'm doing with those rods, while faster rods are more of a feel thing.

I got the 6126 BIIX this summer but have yet to skagitize (new term just made up) it, but am looking forward to it. Anyone fish this rod with a skagit line yet? Thoughts?

Here's some additional thought into this thread. I have developed my casting style mostly fishing the coast and the Deschutes, where often times you have very little room for D loops, so my stroke is fairly fast and minimizes the size of my d loop, hence my preference for faster rods. Does where you do most of your fishing lead your casting to one way or another? IE guys who fish more open rivers with more room like slower rods and a more relaxed pace and vice versa... or not?

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mojo
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2011, 06:59:23 PM »

glad to hear of another 8130 bIIx fan. i like the faster winston rod for the tight compact stroke it likes and the power and accuracy it has with little casting effort.

i think that if one uses a faster stroke on the "load" or "sweep" stroke it can mean a deeper d loop or compromised anchor. coming around slower helps me to control the depth of my d. that said, i think the line length and weight has a significant influence on how deep or shallow the d loop is. this is where the skagit shorts in 18-20' lengths that carry the same weight as the standard or even compact skagit heads really enable close quarter casting with minimal d loop formation. but, different strokes work for different folks....
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willjohnson
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« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2011, 07:29:35 PM »

 I fish with a burkie 7125 and 7133 for almost all my fishing, as they seem to be very versatile for both winter and summer. I don't own a whole lot of rods because I love those two so much! I have experimented with quite a few, but those rods are like my dogs, and I have loyalty to both of them:) Their action is very similar to each other, both full flexing yet pretty fast. Both are my all arounders with the edge to the 7133.
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Horatio
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« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2011, 12:19:20 PM »

My fave Skagit all arounder is the old Scott ARC 1287.
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SnapT
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« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2011, 02:43:31 PM »

I started with a slow rod, now I am finding myself enjoying faster and faster rods...I think i just like the crisp compact feeling with a fast rod and a short head. Is this backwards of what usually happens?  Undecided
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bacon_to_fry
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« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2011, 07:39:03 PM »

have neither the skills nor attention span it takes to be on it all day with a fast rod, so a slower rod suits me fine. loops are tight enough, more important to me that i can make shorter, consistent casts for 10+ hours a day and focus on marinating the fly proper. 
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danimal
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« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2011, 01:54:30 PM »

FK::: What weight skagit head are you throwing on the 8134 Z-axis???
My fishing partner and I teach spey casting on the weekends.  One huge bonus to us the opportunity to test cast so many rods the students bring to the classes.

We have settled on the new Sage Z-Axis and TCX rods as our personal favorites.  The 7136 Z-Axis is a real standout for smooth casting and fishing, two of our students purchased the rod after test casting ours.  The 7126 TCX is an outstanding casting rod for Scandi heads.  I really like the 8129 and 8134 Z-Axis designs for Skagit lines.

We also use the lighter 4wt and 5wt rods for local trout fishing, TFO Deer Creek makes a fantastic 11' 4wt and 12.5' 4/5 wt for very light lines in the 245-270gr range.   

Another outstanding rod is the new 5119 TCX.  I already had the 5110 Z-Axis and when my dealer received the new 5119 TCX, I tried it out on the river for a few hours,,, the rod was never returned to the dealer's rack.  With a 375gr Skagit Short or AFS 5/6 at 340gr, this little rod is amazing.


Regards,
FK
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FK
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« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2011, 12:27:30 AM »

danimal,

On the Sage 8134 Z-Axis I am comfortable with the Rio Skagit 550 or 550 and the Rio Skagit Flight 525.

Some FF like a heavier Skagit line on that rod, it depends upon your individual casting style.

Regards,
FK
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