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Author Topic: shooting line??  (Read 27793 times)
Sandspanker
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Steelheading is my drug of choice!!! And its good

nordy55@live.com
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« on: December 11, 2010, 11:47:52 AM »

What is everyone using for shooting line on there skagit system?? I have found some 20 lb shooting line and was wondering if it would be good for steelhead? I have a few tips and a 550 gr skagit head and all the backing anyone could ask for but need a shooting line. So what does everyone use?? Anyone better then the other?? Thanks
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skagit mist
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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2010, 01:27:46 PM »

35lb and 50lb slickshooter. the new stuff
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Fish Tech
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« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2010, 04:05:48 PM »

I'm using a homemade "tapered shooting line" made from the back end of and old Cortland Spey line.  I have all the running line portion of this old line plus the rear taper and about 12 feet of the body.  This allows me to better mend some of the shooting line when needed.
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SnapT
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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2010, 09:03:12 PM »

If you want distance, 40lb trilene big game or rio slickshooter. If you want something that you don't need to worry so bad about holding loops or memory, I like airflo's ridge running line, but anything from high end sharkskin to a bargin basement would work. I usually like my running line to be at least twice the breaking strength of my tippet. Ten lb maxima can probably hold up about as good as a cheap 20 lb running line, and i don't like the idea of losing a skagit head.
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camosled
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« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2010, 09:48:56 PM »

One critical element when choosing your running line is the break strength of your tips and belly section.   Many products only contain a 20 lb core.   So, a 30 lb running line would ensure you get at least your running line back if by chance a fish wraps your head around a rock, if you tied a loop knot with nearly 100% knot strenght.   I have pulled a few sink tips apart but salvaged my belly because my running line, when tied with a good salt water loop knot, had a breaking strength greater than that of the sink tip core.  Imagine, you tie a bad knot in the running line material, say 30 lb slick shooter, you hang the tip on a deep rock and pull hard.  The loop knot parts and you loose your head, your sink tip and fly. Something to think about.

I've seen more than one angler loose the works to a hot fish that wrapped the entire line and running line around a fish bent for the ocean.  Not a lot they could have done, other than get the #$%@ out of the water and chase the fish a bit sooner than they did.  But I'm not even sure that would have helped. 

To those of you who have already purchased "Skagit Master Volume 2", thanks a ton.  We've sold a truck load in less than 24 hours. 

JM





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Low Holer
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« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2010, 01:20:46 AM »

Let me start with the same disclaimer I use when starting a lot of my posts:  This is a personal preference "thing".  I fish slick shooter but I do have some clients that have issues with the loops slipping thru their fingers (especially when it's cold).  Jeff's comments are definitely worth considering unless you are lucky enough to have Rio giving you lines!  I simply have not found a coated braid core running line yet that doesn't grab itself and tangle when "fishing" a long line (75+ft).  I am not talking about standing on the grass or some other controlled casting environment.  I am talking about scenarios like standing up to my waste in hard running water where my loops are dangling in the boiling water below me.   I am not sure why I don't seem to have the mending issues I hear people reference when critiquing mono-type running lines.  I seem to have no problem mending 80 ft of line right to the fly if I wish.  When I have clients that have issues mending, it usually an easy fix.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2010, 01:22:37 AM by Low Holer » Logged

zmbrooks
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« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2010, 07:59:35 AM »

 For shooting line, I have been using basic mono in 30lb or 40lb.  Ed and McCune turned me onto it last Spring when the Skagiteers invaded NY.  Love the stuff.  Recently I had a slight issue with it in sub freezing temps.  Had some line twists and the stuff didn't want to stay straight.  Used it plenty since then and it's been great in sub 32 degree temps. 

  Just because I never seem to be satisfied, I bought some of that Rio Powercore shooting line.  It has a mono core, with some sort of cold water coating to reduce the coiling.  It has the overall thickness of 40 lb mono and this stuff shoots really well.   I have only used it about a dozen times on the water, but I like it.  Not as much as straight mono but it's good stuff for a mono alternative.  Mine is the smallest diameter, .024 I think.
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riveraddict
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« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2010, 03:47:48 PM »

 

My basic recs are to use the thinnest that one can maintain a grip on during the casting procedure, while retaining a break strength that is capable of recovering your head from snags.

The "thinnest" factor is to maximize casting energy by reducing runningline friction through the guides and water during casting and also to reduce tangling. I've also found that stiffer lines tend to tangle less.

Break strength should be at least 5#s above that of the heaviest leaders used in fishing for the reason already mentioned. This will provide a "margin of error" should the knot from flyline to runningline not be tied at perfect 100% runningline strength.

Personally, I have been using Berkley Trilene Big Game, Solar Collector (the color). It is a very durable, good knotting mono with low stretch and a fair degree of stiffness. Its color is too cool and highly visible under most conditions of lighting. Drawbacks are that it being mono it sinks, and being fairly stiff, needs to be pre-stretched to eliminate the "slinky" coiling effect.

Personally, I wouldn't use any runningline of less than 25# breaking strength, as the odds for losing an entire flyline to a snag are just too high.

 
    
« Last Edit: December 12, 2010, 03:59:24 PM by riveraddict » Logged

camodrifter
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« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2010, 03:26:49 PM »

Im Cheap!  I use Berkley big game
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squamish
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« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2010, 01:31:21 AM »

I use the same cool looking green stuff RA/Ed was talking about,  I had!!! for a long time these spools of mono 40lb I got from the discount bin in tackle shop I used to work at 7 or 8 years ago that was the cats ass since it never coiled.  But it is long since off the market.  If only they new they could have bin in the running line market??

Any way what I was wondering is what are all you guys using to join your running line to the loop on your skagit heads?  I know the hollow mono can be made into a loop and secured with nail knots of mono and a drop of supper glue.  But for the solid stuff?  I am just using a no slip loop knot,  But I have never bin Fancie.  Kinda the type of guy who uses arm length measurements for t-14 and leader length as well.  But I figure I should clean my self up a bit, so will start with the running line knot.   
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G_Smolt
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« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2010, 03:04:14 AM »

Stroft 42lb FLUOR

A fella can get 3 running lines from a single spool, and it will do you about 30 days of hard fishing before you need to either switch ends or scrap the whole shooter and change out...YMMV.

Kind of a bitch to grip mono lines, but once you get the two-finger stopper down, it shoots like none other. Round, thin profile, so even if it is "maytagging" in your backwash it comes out slick as a whistle.
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camosled
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« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2010, 11:11:57 AM »

The knot I use, as shared by RA many years ago, is a large looped modified lefty Kreh salt water knot.  I call it modified because I change where the tag goes back through the hole in the standing part of the knot to help the loop stay open.

JM
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ronic
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« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2010, 03:33:07 PM »

First post and after reading this thread I have a questions so here goes,
any one have comments good or bad about the running Scientific Anglers includes with their Skagit extreme lines? Just got a 520gr and I am wondering if I should use it or get a spool of the Sharkskin hooting line instead.

thanks
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riveraddict
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« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2010, 04:36:17 PM »

Ronic,
   I would suggest using what you have and getting a feel for it before "moving on" to something else.

One thing I would like to clarify here is that I've been on an "ultralight" kick for the last couple of years. As such, the primary factor that I seek in a runningline is that it has the least amount of resistance in hindering the flight of Skagit heads weighing less than 450 grains. This situation has put a bit of a slant on my previous answer towards seeking "thinnest". For heads weighing more than 450 grains, they develop enough momentum during casting that I wouldn't consider "casting resistance" to be of the utmost importance. Instead, my main criteria at that point is to pick a runningline that provides enough grip to hold during the cast, followed by suitable break strength, and then whatever other attributes one needs for their environments of angling. 
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SSPey
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« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2010, 05:54:20 PM »

for heads 450-550 grains (not including tips), the SA standard 20 lb coated PVC running line is a great choice.  It handles well.  It is stronger than Airflo 20 lb Ridge ... in my 'testing' strong enough to break a T-11 tip, a 20 lb Maxima butt section, and the rear loop of an Airflo compact head.  Surprisingly strong for the rating.  It is also thin enough to shoot well - not as far as mono - but better than 30 lb stuff.   If the new SA integrated line is made with their 20 lb running line, then you've got some good stuff to fish.   

for heads over 550 grains, the 30 lb coated lines come into play. 
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