Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/skagdvd/public_html/forum/Sources/Load.php(225) : runtime-created function on line 3
Skagit Light?!
Pages: [1]
Author Topic: Skagit Light?!  (Read 6463 times)
riveraddict
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 418


View Profile
« on: October 09, 2010, 12:35:46 PM »

   Have spent the last couple of weeks fishing my ass off on my return trip from Texas back to WA. Short sessions on the Henry's Fork and Madison. More and longer time on some of my local waters here in WA. The pursuit has been mainly trout on very light rods... 4 & 5 weight Switches and Spey's, a 10 1/2' 5 weight single with a screw-in extension handle to make it an 11' conversion Switch, and a Loomis 9 1/2' 6 weight single that I added a lower butt handle onto.

   So, some thoughts on the "light swing game with DH's". First off, at a certain point of size I just don't think that one is going to elicit more fight out of a fish no matter how light the rod. From my most recent experiences I'm going to say that until a trout gets to around 10-12 inches, they are pretty much just "wigglers"- they don't have the volume or weight to pull "heavy", run, or rip line off of the reel. So, even using something like a 3 weight single on fish less than 10-12 inches really does nothing more than allow one to have a deeper bend on the rod.

   Second, 4 & 5 weight Switches and Spey's, are friggen a blast to cast and fish in a Skagit capacity. They are NOT novelties or "toys" when lined-out properly. Every rig listed above had the ability to throw weighted bugger-type flies on T-8 tips out to 65'-70', and with smaller fare, beyond 70'. On a stream, in a TROUTING aspect, these are big distances!

  

Logged

riveraddict
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 418


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2010, 12:57:55 PM »

   The Loomis 5 weight Switch is about as light of a manufactured-as-an-actual-DH as is available. It threw the same line as the Loomis "true 6 weight" conversion.

   While one COULD use 4 and 5 weight Switches or 4 weight Spey's to pursue Summer steelhead (fish of 6 to 8 pounds average), I would not recommend it. I HAVE caught salmon up to 12 pounds ("jack" Kings, chums, silvers) in AK, INCIDENTALLY while fishing 'bows/dollies with such classes of rods, but, I wouldn't purposely do it because these rods just don't have the power to ENSURE landing fish of such size in a reasonable amount of time. Also, to give another aspect of just how light these rods fight, I was not able to stop some trout on the Madison or here in WA from diving into logs/boulders and snagging me up. The ones of these that I actually saw before they wrapped into the structure I'm guessing to be in the 3 to 4 pound class.     
Logged

riveraddict
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 418


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2010, 01:09:21 PM »

   The reputation of Skagit for being heavy-handed as regards when the fly/line land on the water is a misconception promoted by the huge/heavy flies and sinktips that are generally associated with the method. When lighter/smaller flies are cast with lighter tips (T-8 in this case), the landing of the terminal rig is of no more consequence than any other method. One CAN crash it if needed - to "punch" through the surface for the quickest rate of sink in pocket fishing situations - but by elevating the line-of-sight so that the cast unfolds OVER the water before touchdown, unobtrusive entry of the fly/tip into the water is easily accomplished. 
Logged

zmbrooks
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 34


View Profile Email
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2010, 03:06:24 PM »

Going light on the skagit is lots of fun.  I built an 8'9" 3 wt for small stream trouting on a local trout stream this past Spring.  This particular stream is maybe 60' across on average.  Chopped up an old skagit line to 13' or so,  and it's a blast.  Allows me to skagit cast even when fishing small stream for trout and the occasional pike that roams in this particular stream.  You are right on the money regarding "low impact" landings on a skagit.  I can still fish dry flys on this rig with ease or my custom ultra-light trouting MOW tip when swinging and twitching crayfish.  Too much fun actually.  The real bonus for me is fishing in the really tight quarters where the normal single hand-need room for back cast-guy passes up.

 More proof that skagit casting and skagit line systems are wildly versatile and their applications are seemingly limitless.   
Logged

camosled
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 812


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2010, 10:26:40 PM »

I have to say that my 6110 switch rod is the coolest stick.  A bit heavy for small trout, it jacks big stone flies, traditional steelhead patterns, two or three caddis pupae in a daisy chain, and a 10 foot type 8 sink tip with the right belly section.   I have landed a few steelhead in the mid teens with it and feel super confident that I can put the whoop on them before the become too exhausted...and it makes a killer popper rod for Scott's Ska-opper technique.   I've been casting an Airflo 40 + 8 weight head and a 10 foot floating poly leader.   A 14 foot full mono leader rocks just fine....Super low impact.   

JM

Logged

Hunt-man
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13


View Profile Email
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2010, 01:52:34 PM »

I fish an old Lamiglas 9'6" / 9wt singlehand rod, spey / skagit style for summer steelhead on the Deschutes all the time.  Very light and will cast 60 or more feet with a 10' sink tip, as long as the flies don't get too big and weighted.  I don't think it takes much more time to land them on the smaller rod but it is a lot more fun. 

I'd post a pic or two if I could figure out how....  Wink
Logged

FK
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 84


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2011, 07:10:57 PM »

I decided to fish only two handed rods for 2010.  Most of our fishing in CT is on small to medium sized trout rivers.

Rods were Echo DH 11'9" 4wt, TFO DC  11' 4wt, TFO 12.5' 4/5wt, Sage 12' 5wt (older GIIIe).  These rods cast Skagit shorts and Scandi lines very efficiently at short to long distances.  We fished mainly small wet flies however, dries on long leaders were also very efficient.

When making those annual trips to large rivers in ME for Landlocked Salmon and NY for Steelhead, the heavier DH rods were very familiar and comfortable.

Regards,
FK
Logged

Pages: [1]
Print
 
Jump to: