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Has anyone played with the Rio 20' Skagit Shorts on switch rods?
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Author Topic: Has anyone played with the Rio 20' Skagit Shorts on switch rods?  (Read 17571 times)
Low Holer
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« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2010, 07:24:40 PM »

Hey - one more thought on the whole Skagit short thing that has been indirectly mentioned but is worth revisiting.
A quote from Ed on this thread - "Once you go under that (3x) ratio, casting technique and timing has to be more and more spot-on to yield good results."  He couldn't be more right and I am actually playing into this concept when I am guiding and teaching prospective spey addicts.  I really found this season, after guiding almost exclusively with shorts when fishing tips, that it is forcing my students to be better casters.  The longer Skagits are very forgiving and often times give people a false sense of accomplishment.  Since the longer heads don't require "spot-on" technique and timing, beginner casters can develop some bad muscle memory habits that will eventually prove hard to break as their casting progresses.  When teaching with the shorts, my clients are forced to truly Skagit cast.  They must rely on the load from the sustained anchor and not cheat it out with a wind-up into their back stroke.  The shorter heads force (allow!) them to slow their stroke down, concentrate on sustaining their anchor and getting a good rip, and maybe most importantly, to have a nice easy backstroke that transitions into a fluid power stroke forward (without blowing their anchor).  I have found that the ability to slow down with the shorter heads, really allows people to concentrate on truly a proper casting stroke rather than just hucking it out there.  I was amazed at how fast some of my "newbie" caster progressed this season and I credit a lot of it to starting them on the shorter heads.
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Jelly Roll
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« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2010, 12:37:29 AM »

You guys are killing me, I just got the compacts figured out. If I like the shorts it's gonna cost me some coin Smiley On another note Santa brought me a new Burkie 6126 and it rocks with a 510 compact!
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FK
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« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2011, 09:37:51 PM »

Yup, more coin, I just ordered the Rio Skagit Short in 525gr for my 7126-4 TCX.

Has anyone tried the Wulff Ambush lines on the lighter 4wt switch rods Huh?

Really enjoying the detailed discussions on this site.

Regards,
FK
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lostspey
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« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2011, 11:08:37 AM »

As a recreational fisherman and only being able to get out every other week or so, I appreciate reading everyone's experiences.  My question is if my best fishing setup is a TCX 12' 6" 7wt - 525 Rio skagit short, can I use this head to rod length ratio on other switch or longer spey rods?  I realize the best thing for me to do is concentrate on one rod, one style, etc...
Thanks in advance
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camosled
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« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2011, 12:19:21 PM »

In the short term, that set up will cover a lot of bases.   There will be some debate about whether it is a good set up for someone just starting out.  I'm sure Ed would steer you towards a slower action rod that is a bit more versatile.  Scott likes fast rods.   Two ends of the spectrum.  The 7126-4 will work well with a scandi set up too, but a true touch and go cast, finished with the bottom hand, takes a while to master.   Sustained anchor casts work great with this set up because the mass in this short line really helps you feel the load and the D loop gets there in a hurry.  But as Scott noted earlier, your timing has to be better with a short head because of this.   The line to rod length ratio stuff can be knit-picked to death.  Until you are a proficient caster who can make instantaneous adjustments to the casting stroke, fine tuning your line length will have you chasing your tail.  Rule of thumb:  for rods under 13 feet---shorter heads work fine, even better on switch rods.   For rods over 13 feet---the short heads work too and so do all the other line lengths, meaning, go fishing with sufficient mass in the ass and you'll figure it out.   The only issue you'll have on the water is if your head is too light and you can't cast the fly you want to fish.

JM
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riveraddict
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« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2011, 08:44:38 PM »

Considering the variation in length of available Skagit heads and tips in the industry nowadays, it shouldn'e be that big a deal to get just about any rod lined up almost exactly according to one's wishes. I think the best way to do it is in reverse order: determine the length of what tips you have or are going to use, then select whatever length Skagit head will "fill in" the remainder of measurement needed to reach the desired ratio.

Ratio's under 2.8 should be considered "specialty" for tight quarters fishing and/or largest fly/tip casting, and/or where stripping in line is used as an actual fishing action. 2.8 to 3 is the best "all-around" ratio. From 3 to 3 1/2 is best where longest casting distances are desired, and/or a more "delicate" layout of line is important.
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