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 1 
 on: March 14, 2017, 03:38:17 AM 
Started by camosled - Last post by 9140 greenie
Thanks!!!!

 2 
 on: March 14, 2017, 03:33:57 AM 
Started by Dave_Smith - Last post by 9140 greenie
I cast both left and right handed. I carry my loops in the bottom hand: 1st loop I carry with my pinky, 2nd loop with my ring finger etc.. You just have to do it until it feels and comes naturally. I'm fairly proficient casting a switch and short spey left handed, but I recently started casting my 14fter and am running into a lot of problems with the cast and line management. I just have to work the problem.
Tight lines,
Keith

 3 
 on: March 09, 2017, 04:50:39 PM 
Started by Dave_Smith - Last post by Dave_Smith
Dave,

Welcome. 

There are two things to try when casting across your body:  rotate the rod in your hand so the reel doesn't hang below the rod, but to the side when you are completing the casting stroke and try holding the running line in your top hand, rather than your bottom hand. I've never learned to cast with my left hand up.  Those who did are grateful.  I hope an ambidextrous member can add to your post.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7XJKm92Fs8

This clip might help you with the top hand during the cast...Wait for it.

Jeff Mishler

Thanks and thanks for the vid- very helpful. I think at this point, I'll keep working on both right and left hand up casting and see if it keeps progressing. Hard to even find a place to practice when the rivers are so high. Of course this is the kind of winter we'd have when I get interested in steelhead fishing !

 4 
 on: March 08, 2017, 10:55:05 PM 
Started by Dave_Smith - Last post by camosled
Dave,

Welcome. 

There are two things to try when casting across your body:  rotate the rod in your hand so the reel doesn't hang below the rod, but to the side when you are completing the casting stroke and try holding the running line in your top hand, rather than your bottom hand. I've never learned to cast with my left hand up.  Those who did are grateful.  I hope an ambidextrous member can add to your post.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7XJKm92Fs8

This clip might help you with the top hand during the cast...Wait for it.

Jeff Mishler

 5 
 on: March 08, 2017, 07:35:48 PM 
Started by Dave_Smith - Last post by Dave_Smith
Hi my friends. Thank you in advance for any advice on this. I'm right-handed and new to spey casting, I thought maybe I should just learn to cast with my left arm when needed (because of the wind or obstructions), rather than learning to cast across my body with my right arm. Well, it feels good and fluid, and I like it left-handed, but managing and holding the running line feels weird and my reel winds on the left side, etc. I still like to hold the rod in my right hand while the fly is swinging and while mending, etc, so some of the logistics of trading hands seems awkward. Are these the reasons so many guys have learned to cast across their body rather than switching hands? Should I just learn to cast across my body? Basically, if you had it to do all over again, what would you do, because I'm brand new to all this- this is my chance and THANKYOU

 6 
 on: March 04, 2017, 11:43:23 AM 
Started by camosled - Last post by camosled
SAGE X Series---7120-4

Jeff Mishler


February and March is prime time for winter steelhead here in Oregon. The rods I use are 8 weights for two very good reasons:  I'm usually chucking heavy tips or flies so the 8 weight rocks that gear and I'm often fighting a wild fish that I plan to release and I don't want to spend too much time bent to the corks    with it.  I put the screws to every fish I hook to tire them quickly because short intense exercise is less harmful to them. A toe to toe stand off can kill a steelhead, post release.  For these reasons, seven weight spey rods take a back seat to my eights. 

But angling pleasure factors into the equation as well.  The latest Konnetic Technology has produced spey rods that feel two line sizes lighter in the hand, and that makes the eight weights sweeter to swing and the sevens, a little slice of heaven.  The SAGE 7120-4 X rod is one of those unbelievable sevens that is so much fun to fish that the many eight weights in my garage are seeing very little exercise this season. 

You might think that because the rods are so light they lack the horsepower to cast heavy heads.  That would be wrong. The Skagit line recommendations for the 7120-4 X are 550 grains for a Rio Skagit Max and 575 grains for the Skagit Max Short. Those are lines typically used on light, deeper flexing 8 weights.  I will supplement the manufacturers recommendations by noting that I don't try to jack huge flies with 7 weights because the 8 weights do it so much easier.  But if I'm fishing tube flies sporting cone heads, light bullet weights or small lead eyes, the 7120-4 X weights works wonderfully with a 480 or 500 grain head as long as I don't try to bog it down with 12 feet of t-14.  The 7120-4 X rod is a dream for bouncy water stretches and choppy riffles where the fish can be right at your feet or 60 feet away in two or three feet of water.  If I'm working a run deeper than that or one with slots and ledges to negotiate, I grab an eight weight, a 600 grain Skagit head and a custom sink tip, (usually made out of chunks of t-17 and some floating line).  Mow tips are magic for customizing your presentation with a heavily weighted fly in those slotted runs.

I can only imagine how dreamy the 7120-4 is paired with a Scandi head and small flies during the summer months.  And with the right line, it could be the ultimate skater/popper rod. Stay tuned.

 7 
 on: February 09, 2017, 04:02:53 PM 
Started by trouthunter - Last post by KiwiSkagit
Mini and micro"intruders", how small do you want? Really your only limited by you imagination, and hook size. I regularly fish small streams from tiny creeks, to streams 4/5 meters wide, and use to fish a lot of down and across wetflys, soft hackles, and emerger patterns. So upon my discovery of intruders, a whole new world of possible patterns became a possibility. How small? The smallest I've made was an intruder style fly 12mm long, with a size 16 stinger hook. But i found the most practical to be tied on a size 10 long shank nymph hook (14mm shank) with a wide gape or octopus stinger of a size 10, on a fire line stinger loop of 10lb. If i can ever work out how to post a picture from my phone, or i can email to someone who can post them up for me I'll add to this thread. Otherwise have a look on the OPST Facebook page at the post on mini intruders, in the comments i posted a couple of pictures.

 8 
 on: February 09, 2017, 02:23:46 AM 
Started by Steely - Last post by Steely
Thanks JM for helping me out

 9 
 on: February 08, 2017, 02:07:39 PM 
Started by camosled - Last post by camosled
https://vimeo.com/201333440

In an age when water quality is recognized as a limiting factor for successful/sustainable salmonid populations, it really is amazing how far this river has fallen.  The idea of creating pre-dam conditions and safe passage for sockeye to the historical spawning in the Metolius River was novel, but the implementation has left out serious aspect of those historical conditions AND produced un-forseen consequences for the lower river, turning a world class steelhead and trout fishery into a shell of it's former self.  Nitrogen rich surface water, combined with higher water temps is creating a biological soup of new oxygen dependent organisms creating an ecosystem unfit for the salmonids which require clean, cold water.  The fact that PGE will not address their impacts directly is a shame.


JM

 10 
 on: February 07, 2017, 10:02:54 PM 
Started by Steely - Last post by camosled
The last wrap in front of the turkey feather is purple jumbo guinea. 

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