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1  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Anchored With April Vokey on: February 17, 2018, 11:17:07 PM
Thanks for posting the interview. It was a good listen. I have a lot of thoughts but I leave you with a couple. Fly fishing was my gateway to enjoying the sport of fishing. I had no real interest in fishing until I picked up a fly rod. If someone would have given me that reply, I would have been turned off; not to fly fishing, but to the culture of fly fishing. When I started, I became a hardcore trout fisherman who didn't understand a steelheader's mentality. But I loved to cast a fly rod and I became enamored with casting. That was my path to chasing steelhead.
  I think that you should post some of your outtakes and bloopers. That would be entertaining. You have some great stories and I'm envious at how you are able to articulate your thoughts and ideas.

Tight lines,
Keith
2  Gators ‘n Hens / Gators ‘n Hens / Re: Just because it's such a cool fish on: March 14, 2017, 03:38:17 AM
Thanks!!!!
3  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Line management casting with your off-hand? on: March 14, 2017, 03:33:57 AM
I cast both left and right handed. I carry my loops in the bottom hand: 1st loop I carry with my pinky, 2nd loop with my ring finger etc.. You just have to do it until it feels and comes naturally. I'm fairly proficient casting a switch and short spey left handed, but I recently started casting my 14fter and am running into a lot of problems with the cast and line management. I just have to work the problem.
Tight lines,
Keith
4  Gators ‘n Hens / Gators ‘n Hens / Re: Just because it's such a cool fish on: January 24, 2017, 10:50:55 AM
Tell us more!
5  Geared Up / Geared Up / Asked and answered on: November 19, 2016, 03:03:58 AM
Saw this video on OPST's FB page. I got a chuckle watching it.  This guy is a really good caster too.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=re3wAZ9TR4g&feature=youtu.be
6  Canary In The Mineshaft / Canary In The Mineshaft / John McMillian interview on: March 29, 2016, 04:34:52 PM
Just finished listening to part 1 of an interview with John McMillan.  Worth a listen.  It may ruffle a few feathers, but it does provoke thought and discussion.  I want to throw in my support for both John and April with regards to conservation.

http://www.aprilvokey.com/podcasts/

Tight lines,
Keith
7  It Wiggles with Pokey Parts / It Wiggles with Pokey Parts / Jerry French interview on: February 22, 2016, 11:37:46 PM
Great interview with Jerry French regarding the fly he helped develop "the Intruder."
I've never  had a chance to meet and speak with Jerry or Ed on the brainstorming that went along with this fly.  There were plenty of articles written on the fly, but to hear how the fly evolved was interesting to say the least.  I hope I'm lucky enough get a chance to speak with Ed and Jerry one of these days.  The interview answered a lot of questions, but I have many more.

http://www.aprilvokey.com/podcasts/
8  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Skagit Master 1 price on: September 30, 2015, 09:39:36 PM
vildric,
Just because something is older doesn't mean that it has any less significance today than when it was published. There are resource manuals that have been published many, many years ago that are just as important today.  Maybe even more so.  Fortunately, we all have the privilege of being around the people who had the curiosity, the creativity and the tenacity to invent a whole new technique that has been embraced by so many fisher(wo)men. We not only have access to the resource materials, but to the people who developed them.  In the next 20, 50, 100 years people will probably be paying top dollar for an original copy of the Skagit Master series.  If you want to learn the technique, there is no better person to have as a resource than one of its originators, Ed Ward.  
Don't pay for its age, pay for its quality.
Just my two cents.

Tight lines,
Keith
9  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Where to find the steel? on: September 22, 2015, 02:04:41 AM
I've rarely fished for steelhead when there are lots of salmon in the river.  I know the salmon will displace the steelhead, but what kind of water should I dismiss and what type of water should I target?  Thanks.

Tight lines,
Keith
10  It Wiggles with Pokey Parts / It Wiggles with Pokey Parts / Not another Intruder...... on: August 26, 2015, 02:01:22 AM
Have any of you used turkey flats as a supporting hackle?  If so, does it swim like this guy's fly?  I'm pretty impressed with how this fly looks in the tank. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8l0XdL15MJU

Tight lines,
Keith
11  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Casting in Tight Quarters on: July 29, 2015, 09:18:15 PM
Whoa.  Jeff I consider you a true Skagit Master.  You have great skills.  Sorry I didn't mean to step on anybody's toes.
Sincerely,
Keith
12  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Casting in Tight Quarters on: July 28, 2015, 05:41:01 PM
Thanks Rick,
I  understand all the tricks for getting tight quartered casts out.  I'm just wondering what is possible.   I understand the principals.  I'd like to see the principals put into practice in real difficult situations.  The kind of situations we all come across. The only way to know is to watch and pick the brains of true Skagit Masters.  Push the envelope.
Tight lines,
Keith
13  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Casting in Tight Quarters on: July 28, 2015, 03:55:19 AM
Wait.  If I'm on river left and I'm throwing a cack handed or cast left handed, I would be throwing a down stream poke or a double spey with a poke.  Right?  And I understand the reason for throwing the poke is to set the anchor further out.  The further out the anchor, the shallower the D loop.  The issue I have is that when ever someone demonstrates the cast, they're loops are always going behind them.  Or that they're never up against the bank.
I'm I missing something?
14  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Casting in Tight Quarters on: July 27, 2015, 12:57:53 AM
 Maybe.  Here are my observations:  1.  Every time I see someone demonstrating a cast with no back cast room, they are never up against an obstruction.  They are always five to ten feet off the bank.  I would really like to see someone casting with their backs touching the obstruction.  2.  It looks as though your D loop is forming behind you. It could be the camera angle.  I can't tell.  The reason I want the caster's back to be touching the obstruction is that you can really see if the D loop is totally in front of the caster. If it's not, the fly will catch or hit the obstruction. 3.  Whenever a caster throws a cack handed or left handed cast (river left), they're always throwing the cast across instead of quartering downstream.  The problem I've encountered when I execute the cast is that I have less back cast room off my left than off my right side as I'm quartering downstream. The opposite problem occurs on river right. 
    I know the cast can be performed.  I have done it serendipituosly .  Maybe 50-60ft cast with 11ft. of t-11, fairly big fly, 11ft. switch and a 450 Airflo skagit switch head.  I just didn't know what I did.  It would be nice to know what to work on to get more consistency.  You're video has given me something tangible to consider.
    Sorry if I'm coming across as anal.  In the end, we're probably on the same page.  This problem has plagued me for quite a while, and I hate passing up good water because I lack the vocabulary.  I also hate breaking or losing rod tips; as well as, ripping guides out of their wraps.  I can fix them, but I'd rather spend the time and money on fly tying materials.
Tight lines,
Keith
15  Skagit Master / Skagit Master / Re: Casting in Tight Quarters on: July 13, 2015, 11:19:23 PM
Hey Camosled,
Thanks for the post.  I was wondering how you guys solve the problem of no back cast room.  More specifically when the entire D loop must remain in front of the caster.  On river left, if I'm quartering down stream with an upstream perry or snap-t I have a little more room to play with, but if I have to cast left or cack handed (down stream poke, double spey w/poke) I have no room.  Heavy tips and big, weighted flies exacerbate the problem; as well as, casting in a fast current.  I would love to see a video on how this problem is overcome, or if it can be solved.  So if you could cast from the same location, but take a few steps backward with your six touching the bank, I would love to see a video of that.  I tried working on this problem this past spring, but my rod hit an overhanging branch and I lost the tip of my rod.  Now I'm a little apprehensive.
Thanks,
Keith
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